The birds are welcoming winter

My area had its first snow of the season last evening – just a dusting. Cold weather came with it: not fall-crisp air, but winter’s-coming air. On with the layers, out to the trails.

Mine Falls Park’s trail along the canal sported lacy edging this morning. The trail surface was still in great shape, neither muddy nor frozen.

img_20161121_100915

Mine Falls Park, Nashua NH, 11/21/16

I heard the unmistakable whacks of a pileated woodpecker’s attack on an oak tree nearby. I managed to spot the bird – so dramatic-looking! A flicker in the vicinity wasn’t impressed, though. It apparently wanted dibs on that tree, and it flew around the larger woodpecker squawking its disapproval. The pileated bird paid no attention to it.

This was a remarkable morning for birds in the park, given my short visit. The geese occupied the cove while the mallards were having a group swim in the canal. Tufted titmice swooped down and landed on the trail beside me, looking me over quizzically. A blue jay flew around showing off, perhaps afraid the woodpecker might get all my attention. A robin placidly hopped along the edge of the trail, pecking at whatever robins like to peck at, not at all disturbed by my presence.

Not a bad way to spend a morning, edging gently into winter.

 

Advertisements

Nashua Riverwalk: French-Canadian heritage

In my opinion, Nashua’s best river walk is the unpaved trail along the Nashua River in Mine Falls Park. I give credit to the city anyway for efforts to create an official “Riverwalk” linking Mine Falls and the area behind the old mills east of Main Street. One feature along the way is the city’s tribute to the early-20th-century French-Canadian mill workers.

Parc de Notre Renaissance Francais is tucked into a parking lot just off Main Street, between Water Street and the river. Along with the millworker statue are several plaques offering some information about the influence French-Canadian immigrants have had on Nashua’s industrial and cultural history.

If you’ve never seen this nearly-hidden bit of art and history, take a few minutes to visit it when you’re in town for the Nashua Holiday Stroll on the Saturday of Thanksgiving weekend.

All photos in this post by Ellen Kolb.

0515064136

0515064104

0515064151

 

Good days in Mine Falls Park

As the Granite State Walker blog turns 10 this month, I’m looking back at some of my favorite southern New Hampshire destinations. Today’s gallery:  Mine Falls Park in Nashua. This urban park is accessible from the Everett Turnpike (exit 5W, or 5E to Simon Street), Stellos Stadium, Lincoln Park, the Millyard downtown, or 7th Street off Ledge Street. If you live near Nashua and you haven’t explored this park yet, do yourself a favor and get out there!

 

kolb_boat-launchmf

Two boat launches serve the park, including this one outside Conway Arena.

kolb_mf-dam-late-afternoon

The dam at Mine Falls.

kolb_mfautumn

This path edges the millpond, home to heron and beaver.

kolb_mfhistory

A short history of the park.

kolb_mfmuskrat

Muskrats love the Mine Falls canal. The  canal, nearby Nashua River, and millyard cove are great areas for observing birds and wildlife.

kolb_snowymf

In the winter, I bring my snowshoes.

kolb_soifertmemorialmf

A memorial to a fallen Nashua-area Marine graces the walkway leading to the Mine Falls playing fields.

Muddy trails, four-footed friends

Boots, you fool. Boots. Two days in a row, I’ve gone out in running shoes when boots would have been a much better idea. It’s uncommonly warm for late December, and a recent gentle 24-hour rain left local paths muddy. I’ve been on flat trails close to home, nothing adventurous, but they’ve left me with very dirty shoes. No harm done.

(And what was I thinking when I bought white athletic shoes? Nothing meant to be worn outdoors should be white, except for reflective tape.)

Nashua River at Mine Falls Dam. Spring runoff can cover those rocks.

Nashua River at Mine Falls Dam. Spring runoff can cover those rocks.

I wondered if there’d been enough rain to make Mine Falls into a real falls. The Nashua River can be quite impressive at that spot during a good spring runoff. How about December? Average, I discovered, but still lovely.

I’ve shared the trails recently with a lot of dogs, leashed and unleashed. I don’t have any pets myself, but I have a soft spot for friendly and well-mannered dogs, like the majestic Newfoundland that accompanied its owners through Horse Hill yesterday when I was there. Just on the last couple of walks, I’ve seen a broader selection of canines than usual. To name a few: pit bulls, a Yorkie, standard poodles, a dachshund, a greyhound, and one exotic-looking creature that I had to resort to Wikipedia to identify, a Komondor. No wildlife. Perhaps the dogs saw to that.

The year will end with snow-free trails in my area, thanks to this warm spell. It won’t be the first time I’ll ring in the new year with spring-like conditions. I can always head a couple of hours north if the call of the snowshoes proves irresistible.

Autumn’s edge, Mine Falls Park

I was in Mine Falls Park today, a few days shy of the winter solstice. Leaves are down, everything’s brown. One plowable snowfall at Thanksgiving was heavy enough to bring down some tree limbs that plopped into the canal, and they’re likely to stay there until the Nashua parks department has time to remove them next spring. The faintest skin of ice is forming on the canal now.

IMG_20141218_115935

The path alongside the canal has been cleared of deadfall (pushed into the canal, I expect). I saw fresh white “X”s chalked here and there, marking trees to be cut down or trimmed at some point. Sometimes, Mother Nature gets there first. I walked past one broken-off oak tree with a big white “X” on what’s left of the jagged trunk.

Oddly quiet along the path today. This is a busy urban park, but today, the area in which I walked was nearly deserted. Once I crossed the Whipple Street bridge, I didn’t see a living thing until I spied the swans in the cove near the Millyard. It was so quiet that I could hear the traffic on the Everett, nearly a mile away. That’s very different from my visits on summer afternoons, when on nearby Ledge Street, life is lived very much out loud. Late December is a quieter time.

IMG_20141218_115057

NH projects on 2014’s National Trails Day, June 7

Sure to be seen on Trail Day: tiger swallowtails.

Sure to be seen on Trails Day: tiger swallowtails.

I was happy to find a link on my Facebook feed this morning, directing me to a list of Trails Day projects nearby this weekend. For my southern New Hampshire readers, take note of projects at Temple Mountain, Pisgah State Park (two projects there), and Bear Brook State Park.
Details here: http://www.nhstateparks.org/whats-happening/national-trails-day.aspx

A new trail up Temple, to form a loop with a segment of the Wapack Trail? Yes, please.

If I can’t get out there Saturday, I’ll find something closer to home. Mine Falls will have a cleanup day on the 14th. I owe the trails a little love. Which reminds me – the city of Nashua, probably with some volunteer help, is doing heavy-duty work in Mine Falls Park this week to clean up the canal, pulling out trees toppled in the October ’11 snowstorm. Great job!